Change from Within: Yoga for Youth in the Juvenile Justice System

Learn the skills you need to effectively bring yoga to system-impacted youth.

In partnership with Yoga Ed., Prison Yoga Project is pleased to offer Change from Within: Yoga for Youth in the Juvenile Justice System, an experiential online program that combines Yoga Ed.’s foundational course in Teaching Teen’s Yoga with our Trauma-Informed Yoga for Youth training, facilitated by Yoga Ed./PYP Trainer Kate Beckel. This unique training opportunity also offers six months of access to PYS’s Community website including webinars and a dedicated forum centering on youth programming oriented.

Registration Closed

Change from Within is not currently enrolling. If you would like to be notified when the next round of dates is announced, please enter your information below.


This training provides a solid foundation for understanding individual and systemic trauma as the primary underlying factor for incarceration, and how yoga and mindfulness for youth can address symptoms of trauma.

Our goal is to equip you with the confidence and skills to work with youth impacted by the juvenile justice system and offer them tools to feel safe, empowered, and self-regulated. 

You will graduate from this training with the understanding and confidence to teach trauma-informed yoga to youth in a juvenile detention setting.

Focus: Ages 13 to 18, Youth who are in the juvenile justice system

Cover Photo ©Richard Ross, www.juvenile-in-justice.com

Training Dates:

Teaching Teen’s Yoga: August 12 – October 6
Trauma-Informed Yoga for Youth: October 14 – December 8

Live meetups will take place Tuesdays at 5:00 pm PST / 8:00 pm EST

Objectives

  • Understand the experience of being incarcerated and the impacts of incarceration
  • Comprehend the physiology of trauma and how it manifests in the body and mind
  • Gain insight into adolescents’ physical, mental, emotional, and social development
  • Know the benefits of yoga and mindfulness for teenagers
  • Embody the Yoga Ed. teaching philosophies
  • Create safe learning environments and positive relationships with the youth you are working with
  • Design and develop lesson plans appropriate to the youth you are working with that address symptoms of trauma and support healing
  • Teach trauma-informed yoga and mindfulness to adolescents ages 13 to 18 in a juvenile justice setting
  • Learn how to interact with juvenile justice administration
  • Explore how to get a program set up in a juvenile facility, including prisons, jails, and detention centers

What’s Involved

This course takes place over 16 weeks. Each week includes 2-4 hours of course material (module) for a total running time of 64 hours. Modules include video lectures, live check-ins, interactive exercises, downloadable lesson plans, reflection questions, and key teaching points for each grade group. In a new, self-paced format, this training allows you to learn at your own pace and repeat lectures and practices as often as you’d like!

Course Overview

Week 1 – This week we will introduce ourselves and review the course materials. We will also experience a teen’s yoga class in action so we can start to get a feeling for the work.

Week 2 – This week we will explore the teaching philosophies that inform your work as a Yoga Educator. We will discuss the impact and importance of these philosophies for effective teaching.

Week 3 – This week we will look at what it takes to create a safe space for effective teaching and engaged learning. We will take this a step further by exploring how to cultivate positive relationships with your students through classroom management techniques. We will also introduce the fundamentals of lesson planning for a teen’s yoga class.

Week 4 – This week we will dive into brain based learning. We will examine how the brain develops during adolescence and how these changes influence how students are showing up in the classroom. We will also introduce developmental milestones. We will take what we learn about the brain this week to design yoga classes for students’ developmental needs.

Week 5 – This week we will discuss adolescents’ anatomy and physiology. We will understand how teens’ bodies change during adolescence and how to tailor yoga tools to safely support teens’ physical development.

Week 6 – This week we will begin to introduce yoga tools, starting with adolescents’ breathing and warm-ups. We will also introduce yoga postures for teenagers. Lessons will be interspersed with the benefits of each tool, demonstrations, and tips to put what you learn into practice.

Week 7 – This week we will cover partner poses, games, and relaxation techniques. We will also learn the benefits and skills that each of these promote.

Week 8 – This week we will learn how to get started teaching adolescents yoga and create an action plan to begin teaching yoga. We will also share teaching resources that can help enrich your students’ yoga experience.

Week 9 – This week we will learn what trauma is and what it means to be “at risk.” We will review the mind-body resources and practice how we will use them in a juvenile facility.

Week 10 – This week we will discuss how trauma affects the brain and the nervous system. Participants will share how the symptoms of trauma show up behaviorally for adolescents in a juvenile justice setting.

Week 11 – This week we will dive into the practice of being a yoga educator in the juvenile justice system, including teaching philosophy. We will put theory into practice with experiential activities designed to deepen your understanding. We will learn about cultural humility and how to uncover your own biases, prejudices, and assumptions.

Week 12 – This week we will look at what it takes to create a safe space for learning. We’ll see how trauma shows up in a yoga class in a juvenile facility, and how you can cultivate positive relationships with your students through behavior support strategies.

Week 13 – This week we will dive into the fundamentals of trauma-informed yoga. We will start with understanding mind-body resources and dynamic teaching techniques, including orienting, grounding, centering, language, and more. We’ll also explore how to create a lesson plan, put together a yoga sequence, and cue for a trauma-informed class in a juvenile facility.

Week 14 – This week we will begin to introduce yoga tools, starting with trauma-informed breathing and warm-ups. We will also introduce yoga postures. Lessons will be interspersed with the benefits of each tool, demonstrations, and tips to put what you learn into practice when teaching in the juvenile justice system.

Week 15 – This week we will cover partner poses, games, and relaxation techniques. We will learn the benefits and skills that each of these promote. We will also discuss how to create a safe space for effective teaching and things to be aware of in the yoga environment.

Week 16 – This week we will learn how to get started teaching trauma-informed yoga to teens and create an action plan to begin teaching yoga in the juvenile justice system. We will also explore teaching resources that can help enrich your students’ yoga experience.

How It Works

Our online course provides a 16-week instructor-guided course for an engaging, interactive learning experience. You will have access to the course for 1 year. 

What You’ll Get

  • 16 online modules, with interactive video lectures, experiential exercises, reflection questions, and key teaching points for each age group
  • 16 weekly live check-ins for 1-hour with an instructor and other participants
  • Personalized instructor feedback on 4 lesson plan activities and 2 projects
  • 6-month Supporter membership to Prison Yoga Project’s Community website featuring live and archived continuing education webinars (including nine hours of webinars specific to youth services), the opportunity to connect with individuals and groups working with incarcerated youth, virtual book clubs, and practice videos.
  • Downloadable 400-page color manual (delivered digitally) and color workbook
  • 72 downloadable pre-made lesson plans (delivered digitally)
  • Certificate upon completing course requirements
  • Access to the online course for 1-year
  • Eligible for Continuing Education Units (CEUs)
  • Access to private, global Facebook community group of Yoga Ed. training graduates, for ongoing peer guidance, support, and connections
  • Six months access to PYP’s Community website including regular webinars and a dedicated forum centering on youth programming oriented

Tuition & Scholarships

$798

For those with constrained finances, we also offer a limited number of partial scholarships. Scholarship applications are evaluated based on economic need, identification with a disproportionately impacted group by trauma and incarceration, and the likelihood to apply the knowledge and skills learned in service to the community. You will find the scholarship application here. Application deadline is July 22nd; late applications unfortunately cannot be considered.

How to Receive a Certificate for the Course

For those taking the courses for a certificate of completion, you must satisfy the following requirements and receive a final grade of ≥80%:

  • Watch all video lessons within the Yoga Ed. Academy
  • Lesson Plan Activities (30% of final grade): Complete both activities for building lesson planning activities.
  • Final Project (70% of final grade): Complete and submit your final project. The final project requires you to film yourself teaching a yoga class to the teens you work with or on your own as if you were teaching to the teens you work with.

Meet Your Instructors

Kate Beckel – Kate Beckel E-RYT, RCYT, M. Ed is an educator, Somatic Experiencing Practitioner, and yoga teacher. She has a passion for restorative justice practices and for making yoga more accessible. Kate is particularly keen on empowering at-risk youth with life skills through yoga. Kate is an elementary school teacher, and Director of the San Diego Prison Yoga Project chapter.

Brynne Caleda – Brynne Caleda began her journey with Yoga Ed. in 2005 as a top-performing trainer under the leadership of Tara Guber, offering in-person yoga education and training. Recognizing the importance of Yoga Ed.’s mission, Brynne made equity and access top priorities when she took ownership of the company in 2013. By spearheading the use of online platforms, Brynne strategically leveraged the company’s powerful results in the United States—as studied and vetted by Time Magazine, Harvard, Tulane, and more—to expand Yoga Ed.’s impact across the globe.

For the past 20 years and counting, Brynne’s entrepreneurial mindset has created and scaled multiple successes in wellness education. These include the non-profit Stretch Your Imagination, which brings sustainable yoga programming to Hawaii’s schools; the digital media company Omolulu, which produced several popular wellness programs, including an Amazon top-rated children’s yoga DVD; and other ventures that highlight Brynne’s parallel expertise in education, yoga, and values-based business practices.

Brynne holds a Master’s in Education from the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa, with a focus on the physical, mental and emotional effects of Yoga on middle school youth, maintains Registered Yoga Teacher status with Yoga Alliance, and most importantly, finds joy in being mom to Reef, Kai and Cruz, alongside Dad Alex.

Julia Bond – Julia Bond is the driving force behind Yoga Ed.’s powerful online presence and has guided its expansion from a national to a global brand since 2013. A growth hacker by trade, Julia leverages analytics, creativity, and innovation to deliver rapid revenue growth and scale Yoga Ed.’s global impact while staying true to core values of equity and accessibility for all.

Julia spent her formative years immersed in Buddhist mindfulness practices while learning to code at 10 years old on her first computer. At Brown University, Julia received her Bachelor’s of Science in Human Biology: The Brain and Behavior where she explored the nuanced intersection of data-driven science, centuries-old mindfulness practices, and how human beings find connections in themselves and the world around them.

Julia’s unique and integrated expertise along with her knowledge of full-stack web development allows her to bridge Yoga Ed.’s tech and content for meaningful customer experiences. Outside of Yoga Ed., Julia finds joy through the simple moments of love and laughter with her two children, husband, and rescue dog at home in Honolulu, Hawai’i.

Megan Mcwilliams – Megan McWilliams is a full-time social worker in Austin, TX. She received a dual Master’s degree in Social Work and Public Health from Tulane University where she developed a passion for the mind-body connection. Megan has spent her career in the education system providing individual, group, and family therapy in schools. Yoga became a big part of Megan’s self care practice and she quickly recognized the parallel messages of self- acceptance, self-compassion, and empowerment between her social work and yoga practices. Her journey to teaching developed naturally from this connection and as a Certified 200 hour Yoga Teacher and Yoga Educator she hopes to bring the many benefits of yoga to her students, schools, and families. Megan is an advocate for mental and physical health in her community and sincerely believes in the healing power of yoga. When she is not working, Megan enjoys spending time outdoors camping, hiking, and eating her way through Austin one taco at a time.

Not Enrolled

Course Includes

  • 1 Lesson
  • 4 Topics